What's Happening at the National Afro-American Museum & Cultural Center?

Winter 2021
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Experience NAAMCC exhibits virtually!


Although the National Afro-American Museum and Cultural Center (NAAMCC) is currently closed, we have created new virtual tours of two of our exhibits: the 2020 Art of Soul! Juried Art Show and Queens of the Heartland. NAAMCC director, Dr. Charles Wash, explains, “We are so proud of the work our team did on Art of Soul! and Queens of the Heartland, persevering despite the pandemic, working from home, and opening the exhibits last summer and fall. When we had to close again due to the increasing number of COVID-19 cases, we worked with the marketing staff at the Ohio History Connection to create the virtual tours.”
 
Lead curator Rosa Rojas added, “This was a new experience for us, but we are committed to our Black History mission, serving our audiences and the artists featured in both exhibits. Overcoming obstacles is what we do!”
 

Use these links to view each exhibit:
2020 Art of Soul! Juried Art Show
Queens of the Heartland
 
Special thanks to Ohio History Connection videographer Jamie Marsh for his professional expertise. We also want to thank all of the 2020 Art of Soul artists and judges, and Nichole Washington, who created graphic depictions for Queens. Partial support for this video project was provided by Ohio Humanities, the National Endowment for the Humanities, and the federal CARES Act of 2020. For more information, please go to our Facebook page or email us at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.  Stay safe and visit us later in 2021!

 

NAAMCC is offering a diverse menu of online programs featuring thought-provoking topics covering art, genealogy, and history. We are collaborating with the Harriet Beecher Stowe House in Cincinnati, the Suffolk Public Library in Virginia, the Wright Memorial Public Library in Dayton, and Ohio Humanities to bring these programs to audiences in Ohio and around the country. Use the links in each description to register. For more information, email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

January
Thurs., Jan. 21  • 7 p.m.
A Final Resting Place - A Retrospective on the Ohio Black Cemetery
Presented by Cecelia McFadden and Nettie Ferguson of the Franklin County Genealogical Society African American Interest Group
Cemeteries tell a story central to genealogy and family history with headstones and grave inscriptions. Nonetheless, Black cemeteries' very existence mirrors the significant legacy of African American Ohioans and their transitions from slavery to segregation to the current millennium. Despite efforts to promote societal diversity and inclusion, Ohio Black cemeteries are poignant reminders of the persistence of racism and the dead's spatial segregation. Participants will learn about the formation of African American cemeteries and the racially restrictive land covenants that governed burials through the 1950s across the state. Locations of cemeteries, sections, and famous resting places will be presented.
 
Register for this free education program through this Zoom link. For more information, email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

February 
Wed., Feb. 3
• 7 p.m.
Harriet Beecher Stowe House
Discussion: After Uncle Tom's Cabin: The Horrors of Slavery, Told by the Formerly Enslaved
Co-Leaders:
Dr. John Getz, Professor Emeritus, Xavier University
Dr. Jerry Cline-Bailey, Associate Professor of English, Xavier University
After the Civil War, Harriet Beecher Stowe became increasingly concerned with women's issues, and we'll follow her example by examining questions of both racial and gender justice as well as intersections between the two. In 2021 the
Harriet Beecher Stowe House's monthly discussion series "After Uncle Tom's Cabin: Black Voices for Justice" will consider some of the essential works by men and women in this tradition from the 19th century to our own time. After abolition, Black authors recognized that the fight for equality had only begun. They made contributions to the rich, diverse tradition of Black voices for justice that continues today. 
 
RSVP for this discussion through this link. Donation: $5.00 for non-members. Free for Harriet Beecher Stowe House members.
 
Thurs., Feb. 4  • 7 p.m.
Black Power in Comics Roundtable
Storytellers have always been at the forefront of political and social change. It's no different for Black comic creators, who have historically used their work to shine a light on how everyday people can overcome injustice and become heroes. Join us for a lively discussion with Willie Cordy Jr., professor at Norfolk State University and Regent University, writer and illustrator for City Earth comics, and Vonnell Young, writer for the Delta Dogs comic series.
 
This webinar is inspired by our Behind the Mask: Black Power in Comics exhibit. The event is co-sponsored by the Suffolk Public Library in Suffolk, Virginia. 
Register for this free education program through this Zoom link. For more information, email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
 
Thursday, February 11  • 11 a.m.
Before Her Time: The life of Virginia Hamilton
presented by Julie Rubini and Ohio Humanities
 Virginia Hamilton was born and raised in Yellow Springs, Ohio. Discover how this young African American writer became one of the most celebrated authors of children's literature. Julie K. Rubini is a children's book author and founder of Claire's Day, Ohio's largest children's book festival. She is the recipient of a Toledo Area Jefferson Award, YWCA Milestones Award, and University of Toledo Distinguished Alumni award. Julie's first book, Hidden Ohio, was featured as the Ohio Arts Council Governor's Awards book. Her debut middle-grade biography, Missing Millie Benson: The Secret Case of the Nancy Drew Ghostwriter and Journalist, was the first biography of this amazing woman and received excellent reviews. Julie's most recent Virginia Hamilton: America's Storyteller received a Starred review from Kirkus and is listed in the Bank Street College of Education Best Children's Books of the Year. Register for this free education program through this Zoom link. For more information, email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Mon., Feb. 15
• 7 p.m.
Behind the Mask: Black Power in Comics co-hosted by the Wright Memorial Public
Storytellers have always been at the forefront of political and social change. It's no different for Black comic creators, who have historically used their work to shine a light on how everyday people can overcome injustice and become heroes. Join us for a lively discussion and overview of our Behind the Mask: Black Power in Comics exhibit. The exhibit uncovers the influence of several generations of comic artists and illustrates how comics have changed as America has changed. NAAMCC curatorial assistant Derek Pridemore will explore how these comic artists are forging new stories while honoring the struggles of those who came before. 
 
This event is co-sponsored by the superhero librarians at the Wright Memorial Public Library in Dayton, Ohio. Register for this free education program through this Zoom link. For more information, email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
 
Sun., Feb. 21  • 4 p.m.
Harriet Beecher Stowe House
Queens of the Queen City: Cincinnati Stories of African American Women

Presented by: Hadley Drodge, assistant curator, NAAMCC
Since the 1800s, Ohio was at the heart of social change led by African American women. It was the first free state established from the Northwest Territory, Ohio, home to some of the earliest universities for African Americans. Ohio drew Black women from across the country who found there wasn't space for them in their chosen professions, education, or society at large, so they claimed that space here. These queens broke barriers, but they are more than a list of firsts. They collaborated and formed collectives, and they were friends and teachers, one generation of bricklayers after another. Meet some of these change architects, like the poet and abolitionist Frances Watkins Harper, educator and suffragist Hallie Quinn Brown, author Lucretia Newman Coleman, and civil rights leader Marian Spencer.

RSVP for this discussion through this link. Program fee: $7 non-members. Free for Harriet Beecher Stowe House members.
 
Sat., Feb. 27  • Noon
Art of Soul! Awards Ceremony and Exhibit closing event
This event will feature an artist panel discussion, a virtual Art of Soul tour, and an awards ceremony.
Register for this free education program through this Zoom link. For more information, email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. Special Thanks to The Ohio Arts Council and Honda Mfg. of America for supporting the program.
 
March
Thurs., Mar. 11  • 7 p.m.

"Remember the Ladies:" The 1850 Women's Rights Convention in Salem, OH
Presented by Cathy Nelson and Ohio Humanities
The fight for women's equality began over two centuries ago. Learn about their pervasive struggle through letters and speeches from the fearless and tireless women who fought for their rights, beginning with Abigail Adams to Sojourner Truth and others at the 1850 Women's Rights Convention in Salem, Ohio. Register for this free education program through this Zoom link. For more information, email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Thanks to our sponsors:
                                       
 

Waverly Glover, CPA
 May 12, 1922 - January 3, 2021

 

The staff and volunteers of the National Afro-American
Museum and Cultural Center mourns
the passing of Waverly Glover.

Mr. Glover was a long-time supporter and volunteer
in the early years of NAAMCC. A graduate and former
Harry Belafonte, Esther Williams, and Waverly GloverChief Financial Manager at Central State University, he was an essential leader of several fundraising events, including a gala headlined by actor and activist Harry Belafonte in 1995. In commemoration of a lifetime of service and professionalism, Mr. Glover was awarded an honorary Doctor of Law degree from Monrovia University in Monrovia, Liberia. He was inducted into the Ohio Veterans Hall of Fame in 2015. 

The family requests donations be made to the Springfield Foundation to the Waverly Glover Scholarship Fund or the Dayton Foundation to the Waverly Glover Scholarship Fund. NAAMCC thanks Mr. Glover for his years of support and extends its sincere condolences to his family and friends.

Photo Caption: L to R- Harry Belafonte, Esther Williams, and Waverly Glover at An Evening in the Caribbean Gala May 13, 1995



NAAMCC announces COVID-19
collections moratorium

To facilitate the processing of our current backlog of donations that occurred while the museum is closed due to COVID-19, NAAMCC will not be accepting new loans or unsolicited archive or object donations until further notice.  Please do not bring or mail donations of artifacts to the NAAMCC during this period. Museum staff will not accept any items offered, and all such offers will be declined. We will honor all existing loan agreements and any loans that have been approved before Sept. 15, 2020.   

NAAMCC, like all museums, has a responsibility to maintain the highest possible standards of professional museum practices. A moratorium on collections acquisition and loans is the only option while our small collections management staff focuses exclusively on the significant and complex projects that have been delayed due to the pandemic. In very limited instances, NAAMCC may solicit material of substantial historical importance during the moratorium. However, these exceptions will be rare and need to be authorized by museum administration before any documents or artifacts can be left with museum staff.
 
We will review this temporary policy at the end of the second quarter of 2021 based on the status of the COVID-19 in Ohio. For more information, contact NAAMCC Collections Manager Linda Collins at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or call 800.752.2603 ext. 2124.

Become a supporter of $30 for 30
for Black History Month

 



For over 30 years, the National Afro-American Museum and Cultural Center is the place to learn about African American history and culture! We are not only a resource during Black History Month; we educate all audiences about the great achievements of Black Ohioans and national figures throughout the year.
 
We are continuing to receive donations during the COVID-19 health crisis, so thank you to all of you who have supported us. We hope you will give $30 or more to the campaign and encourage your family and friends to join you in supporting our mission. Your donations will support our online educational programs, collections care, and facilities maintenance.


You can mail your $30 or more contribution to: 
National Afro-American Museum and Cultural Center
P.O. Box 578
Wilberforce, Ohio 45384-0578

 
Or you can make a credit/debit card donation online using this secure link. Thanks for your continuing support!

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